International Criminal Law Essays

International Criminal Law Essays-37
This special issue of the Journal marks the 60th anniversary of the grave breaches regime by inviting leading academics, practitioners, and legal advisers to address individual components of this once revolutionary criminal regime.The papers are rich and varied [and] our objectives are numerous and ambitious.The Grave Breaches Regime in the Geneva Conventions: A Reassessment Sixty Years On September 2009, Volume 7, Issue 4 Editor: James G.

This special issue of the Journal marks the 60th anniversary of the grave breaches regime by inviting leading academics, practitioners, and legal advisers to address individual components of this once revolutionary criminal regime.The papers are rich and varied [and] our objectives are numerous and ambitious.The Grave Breaches Regime in the Geneva Conventions: A Reassessment Sixty Years On September 2009, Volume 7, Issue 4 Editor: James G.

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In the aftermath of Kampala, the outcome achieved by the Assembly of States Parties has been the subject of press conferences, political speeches, blog discussions, and some early responses in law journals.

This Special Issue of the is published just over one year since the Review Conference.

Yet, recently and more than six decades after the famous post-World War II cases examining corporate complicity in Nazi crime — Flick, Krupp, IG Farben, or Zyklon B — business involvement in international crimes is once again attracting the attention of some domestic courts.

By dedicating an issue to the topic of ‘Transnational Business and International Criminal Law’ the Journal of International Criminal Justice takes account of this development.

While it is too early to reach definitive conclusions on the nature, scope and implications of the crime of aggression, enough time has passed to engage in analysis of an intermediate nature, which goes beyond the immediate reactions to the Kampala compromise.

This Special Issue brings together leading academics, representatives of human rights organizations, historians, and younger scholars working within the field.The issue was guest edited by Antonio Coco and Matthew E. Slavery and the Limits of International Criminal Justice Volume 14, Issue 2, May 2016 According to a recent estimate of the Global Slavery Index, about 45 million people around the world are thought to be enslaved today.Yet slavery is strictly prohibited by international law.This Special Issue brings together leading academics, senior practitioners before international tribunals, and representatives of non-governmental organizations involved in business and human rights cases, and provides a forum for a rich, in-depth discussion.In doing so, it enquires into the capacity of existing international criminal law to address business entanglement in international crimes and contemplates its possible future role.Philippa Webb is Visiting Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, Leiden University and formerly Special Assistant and Legal Officer to President Rosalyn Higgins of the International Court of Justice; Associate Legal Adviser to Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo, International Criminal Court; and judicial assistant to Judge Higgins and Judge (now President) Owada, International Court of Justice.She acted as legal adviser to the Kingdom of Bahrain at the 2010 ICC Review Conference at Kampala.She is a member of the Editorial Committee of the Journal .Contributors: Kirsten Sellars, Thomas Weigend, Erin Creegan, Alexander Wills, Leonie Von Braun, Annelen Micus, Beth Van Schaak, Marko Milanovic, Mary Ellen O'Connell, Mirakmal Niyazmatov, Andreas Zimmermann, Kevin Jon Heller, Friedrich Rosenfeld, and Mauro Politi.Under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, enslavement is, in some cases, prosecutable as a crime against humanity or, arguably in some narrower cases, a war crime. This Special Issue of the addresses this question, and asks what role international criminal justice can play in bridging the gap.This special issue was guest edited by James Cockayne.

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